Magazine article Parks & Recreation

Improvements Highlight Mt. Tabor Park's Unique Geology

Magazine article Parks & Recreation

Improvements Highlight Mt. Tabor Park's Unique Geology

Article excerpt

Purchased by the City of Portland in 1909, the 196-acre Mt. Tabor Park has long been a favorite of walkers, joggers, bicyclists, and naturalists. The fact that a volcanic cinder cone lay just below the park's surface was not know until 1913, as workers grading a side-hill for paths and roadways exposed a streak of cinders, making it apparent that the park was sitting on an inactive volcano.

Continued development of the park revealed the core and throat of the volcano. Geologists have theorized that Mt. Tabor's cinder cone is evidence of a volcanic eruption that took place 35 million years ago when the Columbia River basalts began flowing over the region. With funds from Portland Parks and Recreation's 1994 bond measure for park improvements and input from hundreds of Mt. Tabor Park neighbors and users, a Master Plan was completed last year for the park. Key elements of the master plan include forest and habitat enhancement, interpretation, and wayfinding improvements, renovation of the park's amphitheater and restoration of existing facilities. …

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