Magazine article Personnel Journal

Increased Employer Involvement in Child-Support Payments

Magazine article Personnel Journal

Increased Employer Involvement in Child-Support Payments

Article excerpt

Child-support payments are increasingly becoming a matter of employer concern and responsibility. Under federal law contained in the Family Support Act of 1988 (FSA), wage withholding has become the primary method of collecting child support.

Effective January 1, 1994, the FSA requires that all child-support orders must include a provision for immediate wage withholding, regardless of whether the parent is delinquent, unless both parents agree in writing to opt out of the requirement, or a court concludes there is no cause for automatic withholding. The withholding obligation becomes effective either on the date the custodial parent makes a written request, or on an earlier date the State selects and provides written notice to the employer.

In a related development, California is the first state to pass a law making imprisonment a possibility for employers that neglect to collect and forward child-support payments. Under the California law, employers that willfully fail to withhold or forward court-ordered support payments may be punished with:

* 120 hours of community service for a first offense

* 120 hours of community service and/or up to a $1,000 fine for a second offense

* Up to 240 hours of community service, a $1,000 fine, and 240 hours of imprisonment for any subsequent offense. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.