Magazine article Personnel Journal

Corporate Volunteerism Yields More Than Good Feelings

Magazine article Personnel Journal

Corporate Volunteerism Yields More Than Good Feelings

Article excerpt

There are many ways to be a good corporate citizen. There are blood drives, food drives, community-cleanup days and donations for charities. These endeavors all yield benefits for the recipients of the good deeds. But what about the givers?

Although it may be better to give than to receive, for businesses there has to be more to charity than doling out time and money without thought of what is gained in return.

According to a recent study conducted by The Conference Board and The Points of Light Foundation, there is more to be gained from volunteerism. Corporate volunteer programs help contribute to an organization's competitive advantage and strategic goals. Through good times and bad, corporations maintain volunteer programs because they often result in such benefits as:

* Encouraging personal and professional growth that can strengthen the work force through increased creativity, trust, teamwork and persistence

* Broadening potentially valuable contacts with community-based businesses and government leaders

* Enhancing individuals' sense of well-being

* Improving relations with customers who increasingly demand information about companies' good corporate-citizenship activities.

Ninety-two percent of corporate executives surveyed say that they encourage their employees to get involved in community volunteer activities. …

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