Magazine article Dispute Resolution Journal

Commercial: Manifest Disregard of the Law

Magazine article Dispute Resolution Journal

Commercial: Manifest Disregard of the Law

Article excerpt

The 7th Circuit took a novel approach to the doctrine of manifest disregard of the law. The court adopted the principle that manifest disregard of the law occurs only when the arbitrator's award requires the parties to violate the law or does not adhere to the legal principles specified by contract.

The case arose out of the termination of a distributorship agreement between Watts & Co. and Tiffany & Co. Watts, a former distributor for Tiffany, alleged that Tiffany violated the parties' contract and the Wisconsin Fair Dealership Law. The parties agreed to arbitrate their dispute. The arbitration resulted in an award providing the following relief. Watts had an extended period of time to dispose of Tiffany merchandise through its bridal registry; Tiffany could stop selling to Watts at the end of the year and had to repurchase any of Watts' remaining Tiffany inventory.

Watts sought additional relief in court, arguing that the arbitrator manifestly disregarded Wisconsin law in not awarding its attorneys' fees and costs. The district court, however, enforced the award as written and the 7th Circuit affirmed.

Applying the principle stated above, the 7th Circuit found no manifest disregard of the law because no state law prevented the parties from agreeing to bear their own legal expenses. The award not only did not violate the law, it did not depart from the principles in the contract. The court observed that the parties could have included a "loser pays" clause in their agreement but chose not to specify the rule of decision. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.