Magazine article Academe

Balancing Faculty Careers and Family Work

Magazine article Academe

Balancing Faculty Careers and Family Work

Article excerpt

This issue of Academe is about the difficulties of balancing family care with an academic career. It points to the special burden that balance represents for women who pursue faculty careers, to the point of constraining their ability to achieve equity in faculty status. But going beyond just a description of the problem, the articles in this issue also explore solutions and issue a call for faculty to participate in changing their own work culture for the benefit of all.

Mary Ann Mason and Marc Goulden published the first "Do Babies Matter?" article in Academe two years ago, and its impact has been far reaching. In this issue, they turn their analytical lens around and examine the effect of a successful career on family formation. They find that successful women have sacrificed having children, and even marriage, in a way that men are not called on to sacrifice.

We're all familiar with the concept of the glass ceiling, the invisible barrier that seems to make it difficult for women to reach the upper ranks of professional careers. Joan Williams argues that such a glass ceiling exists in the academic world as well, but that a more insidious "maternal wall" may exert an even greater force on both women and men who are trying to combine family work with academic work.

In my article, I try to make the case that successful work-family policies will benefit more than just individual faculty members. There are important equity considerations for the faculty as a collective. Can work-family policies do it all? It's a challenge that requires all of our best efforts. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.