Magazine article The New Yorker

The Talk of the Town: Exit the Wu-Tang

Magazine article The New Yorker

The Talk of the Town: Exit the Wu-Tang

Article excerpt

One evening last week, a small crowd of passersby gathered on the sidewalk in front of 99 University Place, a squat office building in Greenwich Village, to watch a man tossing boxes and trash bags into the street. Before long, a dozen people had set upon the stuff--it being acceptable, in New York, to root through promising garbage, as long as other people are doing it, too.

The boxes were full of papers, files, posters, CDs, and tapes. Within minutes, word got around that everything belonged to the Wu-Tang Clan, the groundbreaking hip-hop collective originally from Staten Island. "Yo, is it true?" one onlooker asked. "Has O.D.B. been evicted?" It was not true: O.D.B., or Ol' Dirty Bastard, one of Wu-Tang's founding members, had not been evicted (though two weeks earlier he had been convicted--for possession of marijuana and crack--and sentenced to two to four years in prison). A few weeks ago, the Wu-Tang Clan--or, rather, the various corporate Wu-Tang entities that make up the vast Wu-Tang empire--vacated its offices on the ninth floor of 99 University Place, and now the superintendent was throwing out what had been left behind. Scavengers dug through the refuse and made off with portable stacks of loot. This is what one of them found:

[middle dot]Four vinyl LPs (including such cuts as "As High As Wu Get," "Duck Seazon," and "Dogshit").

[middle dot]Seven airline tickets, unused, issued to Robert Diggs, a.k.a. RZA, the leader of the Wu-Tang Clan. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.