Magazine article Drug Topics

Food and Hypertension

Magazine article Drug Topics

Food and Hypertension

Article excerpt

The importance of diet has all ways been stressed by health-care professionals, and Charles Dickens' doctor, Fordyce Barker, M.D., was no exception. He watched carefully over the novelist's food intake, especially when heart and circulation problems and gout were taking their toll during an 1868 lecture tour in America.

Here is his prescribed diet, as recorded in Dickens' journal: "At seven in the morning, in bed, a tumbler of cream and two tablespoons of rum. At twelve, a sherry cobbler and a biscuit. At three, a pint of champagne. At five minutes to eight, an egg beaten up with a glass of sherry. Between the parts, the strongest beef tea that can be made, drunk hot. At a quarter past ten, soup, and anything to drink that I can fancy."

Dickens died of a stroke at 58.

The famous writer was only one of many leaders in the arts, science, and governmental ranks to fall victim to the consequences of high blood pressure. President Franklin Roosevelt is probably the most famous patient. …

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