Magazine article Work & Family Life

Playing Politics with Your E-Mail 'Bcc'?

Magazine article Work & Family Life

Playing Politics with Your E-Mail 'Bcc'?

Article excerpt

Many of us make up rules for e-mail based on our own bad experiences. So, typically, our rules are of the "don't do that again" variety. We may even have one set of rules for the workplace and another for e-mail to friends and family.

However, these days we have more than our intuition to guide us, especially at the workplace. In a study of e-mail usage in North America by researchers at the University of Western Ontario, more than half of the respondents reported "overload" as a problem and cited "cc" and "reply to all" functions as chief pet peeves. And for those who worry about office politics, simply deciding whom to put on "to," "cc" and "bcc" lines has apparently become a daily struggle.

A 2004 survey by The ePolicy Institute reports that e-mail and instant messages (IM) have also become a primary source of evidence in workplace lawsuits, with the use of "cc" and "bcc" to discuss sensitive issues making it easier to round up "smoking-gun e-mails. …

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