Magazine article Humanities

Making a Difference: Art for the Ages

Magazine article Humanities

Making a Difference: Art for the Ages

Article excerpt

I am connecting my life to someone else's life," says art collector David C. Driskell, "someone who had a vision about another time, or someone who had different experiences, who wanted to give a view of a person's mood, or the beauty of landscape."

As an educator and art collector, Driskell respects the significance of the past. "The humanities for me are the basis for the whole learning experience. They inform us so much about the past."

Recently retired, Driskell was a teacher and curator at the University of Maryland for more than twenty years. He has lectured at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Corcoran Gallery of Art, and the Art Institute of Chicago, among other museums, and has curated numerous exhibitions. He puts his expertise to personal use as well. Since college, he has devoted himself to preserving cultural traditions by collecting African American art and artifacts dating from the era of slave ships to modern times.

By buying and preserving pieces outside what he calls the "quality canon," Driskell has helped change art collecting trends. In recent years, museums have become more inclusive in their selection of art, in terms of race, gender, and ethnicity. Ever the activist, Driskell calls for a deeper revision of artistic standards and a diversification of the canon. He praises private collectors like Bill and Camille Cosby for gathering a broad range of American art. Their collection is showcased in the book The Other Side of Color, which Driskell put together.

It will be released in March 2001. Driskell's own collection of paintings, lithographs, drawings, and sculptures span almost four hundred years. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.