Magazine article Montessori Life

Accreditation: Big Work, Big Benefits!

Magazine article Montessori Life

Accreditation: Big Work, Big Benefits!

Article excerpt

I hear it often: "I am too busy to even think about accreditation." Or "I'll work on it as soon as I add the elementary program, or finish the building, or complete the capital campaign." I can't help thinking that these are missed opportunities: opportunities to gather the strengths within the school community to reflect, collaborate, and strategize about the work you do and aspire to do.

When was the last time you dedicated yourself to the process of selfassessment? And do you understand that when it comes to accreditation, process is as important as product?

Accreditation should be valued for many reasons. It can be a symbol of an elite status, as fewer than 10% of AMS member schools are accredited. In some states, accreditation is required for licensing or necessary to be eligible for funding. Parents see accreditation as an assurance that the school meets high standards.

In the educational community, accreditation means trust. When a school is AMS-accredited, it is recognized by the Montessori community as an excellent institution that meets high standards. It is also recognized as a school that is true to its mission, and a school that embraces the challenge of looking critically at itself in order to recognize strengths and opportunities and to strategically plan for future growth. Accredited schools are a model for Montessori schools in particular, as well as for independent and public schools in general.

Accreditation, as a process, is an opportunity to think about, talk about, and write about the uniqueness of your school community. …

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