Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Tobacco Linked to 63 Percent of Cancer Death Burden among Black Men

Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Tobacco Linked to 63 Percent of Cancer Death Burden among Black Men

Article excerpt

SACRAMENTO, CALIF.

Anew analysis links tobacco smoke to 63 percent of cancer deaths among African-American men in the United States. The smoke-related cancer death burden for African-American men is highest in the South at 67 percent, with the lowest burden-43 percent-in the Northeast. The percentage is 60 in the West and 63 in the Midwest.

The study was authored by Dr. Bruce N. Leistikow, associate professor in the department of public health sciences at the University of California, Davis School of Medicine and Medical Center. In research published last year, Leistikow estimated that more than 38 percent of cancer deaths for African-American men were related to tobacco smoke. His new study uses additional years of National Center for Health Statistics data to refine that analysis. He now also separately analyzes data for each U.S. Census region.

Leistikow notes one explanation for regional differences could be intervention disparities. Western and Northeastern states have some of the strongest tobacco control programs in the nation, while Southern and Midwestern states have been slower to initiate such increasingly common policies as higher cigarette taxes, smoke-free spaces, anti-smoking education programs and stiffened penalties for selling tobacco to minors. …

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