Magazine article The Spectator

Wicked Ways

Magazine article The Spectator

Wicked Ways

Article excerpt

UNTIL recently, I was never quite sure what is meant by a Grosvenor Coup. I've often heard players exclaim to an opponent after going down in a contract, 'You Grosvenor'd me!', and I've always assumed it was an insult. I thought they meant that the opponent had defended so badly that they had got a false picture of the hand, and had gone down in a contract they could have made.

But that's not quite right. I've just read David Bird and Nikos Sarantakos's excellent new book Bridge Hands to Make You Laugh . . . and Cry (Batsford), and it turns out that the Grosvenor Coup is in fact a bit of deliberate mischief-making on the part of a defender. It was invented by Philip Grosvenor in around 1960 for the simple purpose of annoying another player. What it involves is this: declarer is in a contract that is doomed to failure; by deliberately misdefending, a defender gives him a chance to succeed; but making the assumption that the defender wouldn't have defended in this way if it allowed the contract to be made, declarer tumbles to defeat anyway. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.