Magazine article PM Network

Tiger Trap

Magazine article PM Network

Tiger Trap

Article excerpt

CASE ANALYSIS

An Indian ministry and a conservation organization has dubbed their attempt to protect endangered tigers a project, but they're not running the endeavor like one.

Founded in 1973 by the Indian Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF) in cooperation with the World Wildlife Fund (WWF), Project Tiger established nine tiger reserves in various Indian states in an effort to save the dwindling tiger population. It is responsible for providing money and expert knowledge for 27 reserves.

The Sariska Tiger Reserve in the northwestern state of Rajastan should be home to 15 tigers. Despite claims in Project Tiger's publications that the initiative "has put the tiger on an assured course of recovery from the brink of extinction," a 23 January article in Bombay-based Sunday Express reported that there may not be a single tiger left in the reserve. Over the next few weeks, probes seemed to confirm the story and research in other reserves exposed decreasing tiger populations.

The sole managers, MoEF, reportedly did not treat the reserves as a project at the onset, says Oliver F. Lehmann, PMP, vice president of professional development for PMPs Troubled Projects Specific Interest Group. "A professional project manager would have created a realistic plan outlining requirements, scope, constraints and objectives. A timeline and a realistic cost baseline with appropriate funding, possibly supported from international sources, would have helped ensure appropriate resource allocation," Mr. …

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