Magazine article The Spectator

Anglophilia

Magazine article The Spectator

Anglophilia

Article excerpt

Four new books by or about English experts are worthy of mention. The first is Chess: 60 Years On with Caissa and Friends by Alan Phillips published by Caissa editions, price £13.99. Alan Phillips once tied with Leonard Barden for the British Championship. His undoubted talent was restrained by his offboard duties as a headmaster. Nevertheless, this charming book is packed with thought-provoking comment and fine wins against such players as Hartston, Nunn and Golombek.

The next book is 101 of my Best Games of Chess by F. D. Yates, published by Moravian Chess, price £17.99. This is a reprint and suffers from antediluvian notation and a cumbersome method of displaying the notes. Nevertheless, Yates, who won the British Championship six times between 1913 and 1931, deserves to be studied for his tactical acumen. His victims included both Alekhine and Nimzowitsch.

Next is Amos Burn, A Chess Biography by Richard Forster (with a foreword by Viktor Korchnoi) published by McFarland, price £55. This book weighs the proverbial ton and is clearly a labour of love. Amos Burn hovered on the fringes of being a world title candidate and this is the type of book which is almost incapable of being exhausted. As we shall see from this week's puzzle, Burn was capable of the most amazing tactical coups.

Finally, though somewhat off-message, The New Mah Jong, The International Game by D.B. Pritchard published by Right Way Books, price £3.99, deserves comment. Pritchard was for many years a leading British international chessplayer and has achieved the distinction of selling more copies of his chess books than any other chess writer, certainly in the UK and probably throughout the world. …

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