Magazine article The Spectator

Hypermodern Revolution II

Magazine article The Spectator

Hypermodern Revolution II

Article excerpt

Richard Reti's most powerful games with his invention, the Reti Opening, came in the New York tournament of 1924. Here he defeated Edward Lasker, Bogolyubov, Janowski and Capablanca with his new discovery. The following game is one of the least well-known yet most typical with the novel system. White fianchettoes both bishops, restrains his centre pawns and, most importantly, develops his queen to the supremely paradoxical square al. When I first saw the position from the late opening in Nimzowitsch's book My System, I at once vowed that I too would one day destroy my opponents by placing my queen on al.

Reti-Yates; New York 1924; Reti Opening

1 Nf3 d5 2 c4 c6 3 g3 Nf6 4 Bg2 Bd6 5 b3 0-0 6 0-0 Re8 7 Bb2 Nbd7 8 d3 Reti later realised that 8 d4 is correct here, frustrating Black's entire opening strategy. 8 . . . c6 9 Nbd2 e5 Black now has a perfectly good position. 10 cxd5 cxd5 11 Rc1 The start of an amazing yet quintessentially hypermodern manoeuvre. Reti plans to double his rooks on the c-file and then further assault Black's centre by means of Qa1. 11 . . . NfS 12 Rc2 Bd7 13 Qa1 Ng6 14 Rfc1 Bc6 15 Nf1 Qd7 16 Ne3 h6 Alekhine castigated this careless move as the decisive error which permits White's eccentric strategy to triumph. He recommended instead 16 . . . d4 17 Nc4 Bc7 when Black still has a perfectly playable position. 17 d4 This advance in the centre justifies White's strategy. Black is forced to plough on in the centre but now the full force of White's dark square pressure becomes swiftly decisive. 17 . . . e4 18 Ne5 Bxe5 This unfortunate capture is obligatory. …

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