Magazine article Sunset

A Local Master Gives His Muses Their Due

Magazine article Sunset

A Local Master Gives His Muses Their Due

Article excerpt

William T. Wiley is a hard artist to pin down. Attend an exhibition of his artworks, and on one wall you might see a delicate watercolor of a studio still life, and next to it a riotously expressionistic canvas of a burning village. On another wall hangs a suite of technically flawless prints; on the floor below them, a tangle of plastic milk bottles is held together by strands of painted string.

All of which makes the title of Wiley's exhibit at the M. H. de Young Memorial Museum--Nothing Lost From the Original: William Wiley Looks at Art History--sound almost academic. The show's nearly 50 paintings, drawings, and sculptures are based on works by such masters as Pieter Brueghel, Leonardo da Vinci, Francisco Goya, and James McNeill Whistler. Alongside each piece by

Wiley is a small photograph or color photocopy of the work that inspired it. Wiley has always been candid about his muses. In the late '60s his work came into its own when he produced a remarkable series of watercolors about nothing more than the process of painting itself. …

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