Magazine article Drug Topics

Under Pressure

Magazine article Drug Topics

Under Pressure

Article excerpt

A committee consisting of experts from the American Society of Hypertension (ASH) is urging private and government health insurers to reimburse hypertension patients for the purchase of home blood pressure monitoring devices. A panel of experts from ASH said that home or self-monitoring of blood pressure saves not only lives but also money, by reducing the occurrence of strokes, heart attacks, and other cardiovascular diseases.

The ad hoc panel of seven leading experts recently published new guidelines that encourage self-monitoring of blood pressure for the majority of hypertension patients, excepting only those who are obese or have irregular heart rhythms (see Drug Topics, June 26, 1995). The panel presented a draft of the guidelines last May at its 10th Annual Scientific Meeting, held in New York City. The final guidelines were printed in the beginning of this year in the American Journal of Hypertension.

The panel recommended aneroid sphygmomanometers as the first choice for patients because they are "reasonably accurate and can very easily be checked by connecting the gauge to a mercury column." The committee also said that the devices are the most inexpensive monitors and little can go wrong with them. The doctors on the panel said those aneroid devices with a "D-ring" cuff are easiest to operate. Because the aneroid devices require that patients have manual dexterity and good hearing to operate them, the panelists recommended that elderly patients use the electronic devices.

The panel suggested that patients check their home blood pressure devices in the doctor's office for accuracy before home use. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.