Magazine article The New Yorker

The Snowman Cometh, Stayeth; Pop Notes

Magazine article The New Yorker

The Snowman Cometh, Stayeth; Pop Notes

Article excerpt

Hip-hop is a lot like high school, where consensus rules: it is painfully clear who the cool kids are. And for most of 2005 the twenty-eight-year-old Atlanta rapper Young Jeezy has been the coolest kid, important to both Internet obsessives and casual consumers. Late last year, Jeezy became part of a group of Atlanta rappers called Boyz N Da Hood that was signed by the hip-hop mogul P. Diddy but left the group after his excellent debut, "Let's Get It: Thug Motivation 101" (Def Jam), went platinum. (It has sold more than three times as many copies as the self-titled effort by the manufactured band.) In the past few months, Jeezy has become the rapper everyone wants as a guest on his record--he has already appeared on songs with Jay-Z, Bun B, and T.I., among others. Jeezy's voice is a serrated drawl, full of breath and usually ending in a rising whine, as if every line were a variation of one question: "What do you think of that?" His trademark phrase isn't even a phrase, really--it's simply the word "yeah," drawn out for several seconds and sounding like it means anything but what you think it means. …

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