Magazine article International Musician

Safe Sound in an Age of Living Loud: Correct and Safe Use of In-Ear Monitors

Magazine article International Musician

Safe Sound in an Age of Living Loud: Correct and Safe Use of In-Ear Monitors

Article excerpt

In a loud stage environment, musicians become accustomed to hearing their monitor mix at high volume. Some use inear monitoring systems (IEMs) to reduce the impact, but if the volume on the device is not regulated and lowered, it's no solution. IMEs are only considered protective devices if they are used at safe levels.

IEMs are in demand because they isolate the ear from ambient noise and artists can hear the intended signal clearly, at a much lower volume. Critical to the equation, though, says Michael Santucci, Au.D., a researcher and expert who specializes in hearing conservation, is much lower volume. It requires modifying user behavior and listening patterns.

Look no further than the iPod. Studies have shown, in case after case (especially with teenagers), that there was irreversible damage because of volume and prolonged listening. Do most musicians use ear protection? "No," says Santucci, "Are attitudes changing? Absolutely"

It's like sun exposure, he explains: it's both how strong it is and how long you're exposed. In music, it's personal susceptibility, how loud, and how many hours you're in it. "We do pit crews for Broadway plays. Is it terribly loud? Not always, but they're doing it six hours a day" Nowadays, Santucci frequently works with orchestras because they are featuring more pop stars. The added decibel (dB) quotient can be deafening to orchestra members. Santucci says, "Risk goes up with volume and length of exposure."

A recent study out of Vanderbilt University showed that, regardless of whether they used floor wedges or IEMs, subjects turned them up to their usual listening level. Everybody had three days of in-ear and three days of floor wedges at different times and in different venues. Every musician turned to exactly the same loudness every day.

"If you've been practicing guitar for years at 110 dB with wedges, the natural tendency will be to turn your IEMs to 110 dB, even if it's not needed," Santucci says. "And until the audiologist says you need to turn it down to here, their brains tell them to go back to the level they're used to."

The good news is that the second part of the study showed that musicians can recalibrate their brains to listen at a lower level. After a couple of weeks, it becomes the norm. Santucci says, "It's habit-like the timbre of your instrument, pitch- it's all because you've done it a million times. Loudness goes right along with it. …

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