Magazine article Variety

'L'Affaire De Netflix'!

Magazine article Variety

'L'Affaire De Netflix'!

Article excerpt

CORNERED AT HIS OWN Cannes party, Ted Sarandos gave a title to the controversy that had engulfed his company and overwhelmed all other chatter on the Croisette. "Cannes loves a scandal, and this one is called 'L'Affaire de Netflix,'" the streaming service's content chiefjoked.

"L'Affaire" was at times the only thing anyone talked about at Cannes. The festival's decision to effectively block Netflix from future competitions after accepting two of its movies this year appears to be a loss for the streaming service and a win for French cinema purists. But viewed at a time in which the streaming giant is releasing a glut of high-profile original programming, Netflix's south of France sojourn reveals plenty about its priorities as it continues to upend the television and film establishments.

By the end of May, Netflix will have premiered 28 original series, films or specials. Even by its own standards, that's a high volume of original content - more than it debuted in April or will in June. Among the series unpacking new seasons this month are Emmy winners "House of Cards" and "Master of None" as well as Emmy nominee "Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt." They return with new episodes just days before the cutoff for 2017 Emmy eligibility.

That's not a coincidence.

Netflix loves to tout its psychographic, global perspective - the idea that a mother living in India might have tastes similar to those of a teenager in Colorado, and that both viewers can be similarly satisfied. But insiders concede that while the company prides itself on a lack of regard for demographics and other concerns that weigh on linear programmers, awards consideration does influence what gets released when. "House of Cards" usually premieres in February or March. A late start on production this time around meant that season five would miss that mark this year. But Netflix execs were conscious of getting the new episodes on the service within the current Emmy eligibility window. "Cards" starts dealing May 30, one day before that window closes.

Since becoming first a player, then a defining presence in original programming, Netflix has eschewed certain traditional forms of marketing and publicity. It pulled out of the Television Critics Assn. winter press tour and isn't scheduled to participate in the upcoming summer tour. And several agents who spoke with Variety expressed concern that some of the company's scripted series are launched without adequate marketing support - disappearing into an ever-expanding library after a brief tour on the service's home screen. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.