Magazine article Screen International

'Paris Can Wait': Toronto Review

Magazine article Screen International

'Paris Can Wait': Toronto Review

Article excerpt

Dir/scr. Eleanor Coppola. US, 2016, 92 mins.

Known primarily for her documentary about the making of Apocalypse Now, Eleanor Coppola fully enters the family business with her first fiction feature at the age of 80. Paris Can Wait, the story of a film producer's wife (Diane Lane) who inadvertently goes on a road trip through France with her husband's roué business partner (Arnaud Viard) is a soft, slim, albeit charming, tale, filled with food, flowers, and good wines (with a nod to the other family business)

And good performances. It's a credit to the often-underused Diane Lane, playing opposite the twinkly-eyed rogue Viard, that Paris Can Wait rises from its pretty shackles of being an old-fashioned film shot and scored in a palpably old-school way. More mature US audiences in particular should respond, attracted by the Coppola name. Paris Can Wait traverses much the same themes as the UK's recent Le Weekend, but add the foodie angle and home business starts to look tasty.

The road from Cannes to Paris is dramatically flat, but Lane and Viard prove good company. She plays Anne, the patient empty-nester wife of producer Michael (Alec Baldwin). As Paris Can Wait starts, they're at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival (judging by the Ingrid Bergman posters) where he's preoccupied, always on his phone, but they seem to have a happy marriage nonetheless. Audiences will read into this references to Eleanor's life as the wife of Francis Coppola, and indeed Paris Can Wait is a fictionalised account of an interlude in the director's own past. …

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