Magazine article Screen International

'Operation Chromite': Review

Magazine article Screen International

'Operation Chromite': Review

Article excerpt

Dir: John H. Lee. South Korea. 2016. 110 minutes.

"Get God on the phone. Tell him it's me. Tell him we need more time," barks Liam Neeson, playing General Douglas MacArthur in John H. Lee's engaging but nationalistic, locally-shot Korean War epic about a covert operation to prepare the way for the Incheon landings, a turning point in the conflict in 1950.

It's hard to take Neeson seriously with such awkward dialogue, but his name attached to the project was enough to help the film open strongly at home, where it took $13.5m (or 1.79m admissions) on its first weekend (July 29-31), despite intense competition from local hit Train to Busan. While Neeson's role is not extensive, he pops up throughout the film dishing out orders and arguing with other high ranking military officials from the Truman administration over the feasibility of the operation. The film hits screens in North America on August 12, where Neeson's presence may also pique interest, though on a much lesser scale.

Taking place three months after the Korean War began in 1950, when North Korean troops had forced South Korean forces to the southernmost tip of the peninsula, 'Operation Chromite' was devised and led by General MacArthur with the goal of cutting offthe North Korean supply line to the South.

The operation itself involved staging a landing akin to Normandy on the shores of the North Korea-occupied Incheon, west of Seoul. To give this risky mission its best chance of success, the General ordered a covert unit named 'X-Ray' to be set up to infiltrate the North's forces. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.