Magazine article Psychology Today

Is Mental Illness the Exception or the Rule?

Magazine article Psychology Today

Is Mental Illness the Exception or the Rule?

Article excerpt

TO SOME, the estimated number of people who deal with psychiatric conditions-one in five during any given year-already seems unbelievably high. But judging by new research from one of the most significant long-term mental health studies ever done, that estimate is actually far too low.

The Dunedin Study has followed more than 1,000 individuals in New Zealand for 35 years, starting when the subjects were only 3, and has generated many scientific publications. The goal of its latest effort, reported in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology, was to identify the characteristics of people who had managed to remain free of psychiatric diagnoses.

What was surprising was how small this group turned out to be: Just 17 percent of the sample did not meet any criteria for a psychiatric disorder at any of the study's multiple assessment points. Far more common were individuals who, over the decades, had occasionally met the criteria for one or two disorders-most commonly anxiety, depression, and substance abuse. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.