Magazine article New Oxford Review

Numbering My Days: How the Liturgical Calendar Rearranged My Life

Magazine article New Oxford Review

Numbering My Days: How the Liturgical Calendar Rearranged My Life

Article excerpt

Numbering My Days: How the Liturgical Calendar Rearranged My Life. By Chene Heady. Ignatius Press. 224pages. $16.95.

Chene Heady sensed a certain lack in his life, a particular loss of direction and peace, and he decided to reorient his days according to the liturgical calendar of the Church. This is not a new approach; Heady, a writer published in this magazine, mentions John Keble's The Christian Year (1827), which reflects the structure of the Anglican liturgical year in poetry. And it is a wonderful idea: to "connect the glories of eternity with the mundane matters of daily life." As Keble, a leader of the Oxford Movement, pleaded to God, "Help us, this and every day, / to live more nearly as we pray."

Every day for a year, Heady wrote a short meditation with the idea that at the end he would see if such consciousness of daily readings and prayers made a difference in his perception of his life and actions. Most of the days that made it into the book are Sundays, major feasts, and, for some reason, Wednesdays. Because Heady is a young college professor with a family, most of the meditations mention how all the scheduled readings mesh with these aspects of his life. Such small entries containing funny family stories make for light reading, and yet Heady has, like most of us, real struggles trying to align his life more closely with the Gospel.

Two areas of doubt that plague him are whether to have a second child and whether to buy a more comfortable house, surely quandaries many couples face. By the end of the year, we learn the outcome of one of these debates. By giving us a peek into the decision-making, Heady reveals not so much about how the cyclical readings came to bear on events but more about how they didn't. For what is inspiring about this book is the way Heady, a convert, turned to the Church as a guide and source of wisdom, not the extent to which he actually followed Church teachings. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.