Magazine article Distance Learning

Use of Blackboard Collaborate for Creation of a Video Course Library

Magazine article Distance Learning

Use of Blackboard Collaborate for Creation of a Video Course Library

Article excerpt

Introduction

Feedback is a central aspect of the assessment process of student learning in terms of elevating student performance and achievement (Gibbs & Simpson, 2004; Lunt & Curren, 2009). Feedback should relate to performance in terms of goals, criteria, and expected standards (Nicol & MacFarlane-Dick, 2006) and should also be timely, detailed, and specific. Furthermore, it should reinforce content and encourage self-reflection. Lack of timely and meaningful feedback on assignments and uncertainty regarding the workload assessment criteria and weight have been identified as major reasons why students leave higher education (Kirk & Greaves, 2009). According to the literature, evaluation process with video recording strengthens the students' self-esteem and self-confidence. Video feedback is unique because it allows course participants to look at themselves "from a distance," thereby giving them a realistic picture of their own skills (Fukkink, Trienekens, & Kramer, 2011). This type of feedback has been demonstrated to have a more lasting impact on the students' communication skills than conventional education such as lectures or textbook only (Nilsen & Baerheim, 2005). As highlighted by the evidence, it is vital to introduce this teaching and learning method to nurse anesthesia students as supplemental to the traditional faculty feedback and evaluation of students' oral presentations to enhance understanding of the students' individual strengths and weaknesses.

Several studies have established the efficacy of using constructive feedback by videotaping medical students' interaction with a patient to teach and enhance their clinical and communication skills (Lane & Gottlieb 2004; Nilsen & Baerheim, 2005; Ozcakar et al., 2009; Paul, Dawson, Lanphear, & Cheema, 1998). Videotaped constructive feedback has been found to enhance student communication skills when compared to conventional didactic method (Lane & Gottlieb 2004; Nilsen & Baerheim, 2005; Ozcakar et al., 2009; Paul et al., 1998). A study conducted by Lane and Gottlieb in 2004 found 74% of the medical students improved their interviewing skills after video review of their performance. In a prior study Paul et al. (1998) used three different types of feedback while videotaping student interviews, which consisted of self-critique as well as peer and instructors' feedback. It was found that 73% of the study participants believed that self-observation influenced development of their clinical skills. In addition, this study found that selfcritique and peer feedback increased students' awareness of their strengths and weaknesses, thus providing an opportunity to improve their consultation knowledge and skills. The use of various feedback techniques has shown to improve students' clinical skill; however, most students felt anxious during the video recording process. Nilsen and Baer- heim (2005) reported similar findings that the students have experienced a considerable amount of anxiety and apprehension before and during the videotaping course, resulting in a strong need for reassurance and a positive evaluation.

Recent studies have demonstrated the benefits of video-facilitated feedback in anesthesia and surgical simulation with improvement in nontechnical skills (Byrne et al., 2002; Savoldelli et al., 2006; Scherer et al., 2003). Byrne et al. (2002) examined the effect of video feedback on anesthesia residents' performance managing simulated anesthetic crisis in a multicenter study. They found shorter "median" time to solve a clinical problem after participants videoreviewed their own performances. Savoldelli et al. (2006) compared the educational efficacy of two types of feedback, oral and videotape-assisted oral feedback, with a no debriefing group during simulation with 42 anesthesia residents in a randomized control study. The authors demonstrated that the provision of oral feedback, either assisted or not assisted with videotape review, resulted in significant improvement (P < 0. …

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