Magazine article Sculpture

The Journal Gallery

Magazine article Sculpture

The Journal Gallery

Article excerpt

Brooklyn Daniel Boccato The Journal Gallery

Brazilian-born Daniel Boccato's first solo exhibition in New York presented a fascinating demonstration of pluralities in terms of the linear logistics of fate. The exhibition consisted of half-a-dozen brightly colored, monochrome bas-reliefs in resin-soaked, cast fiberglass. The quirky silhouetted forms belie the sophistry of their facture-faux naif that is neither faux nor naive. Boccato builds poorly constructed molds in order to create intentionally "bad sculpture," in the vein of socalled "Bad Painting" Conceptually, this essentially disingenuous inherent contradiction is like staring into a funhouse mirror in which one's image is repeated ad infinitum. Intentionally stupid equals intelligent equals stupid equals clever. So, is Boccato clever or a jerk? Or are they the same thing? It is a duplicitous conundrum. He is attempting to capture an intuitive or naturalistic gesture by contravening craft while expertly employing current materials in a sloppy fashion. Maybe it is irritatingly smart; it is certainly not ignorant.

Many 20th-century Western Modernists looked to indigenous tribal cultures in their desire to countermand European conventions of style and materialistic elitism, which they declaimed as didactic and academic, a position that had already become academic by the time of its utterance. In fact, you could argue that Modernism was becoming tribal in and of itself as it hastily descended to the status of the mundane. …

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