Magazine article The New Yorker

Briefly Noted

Magazine article The New Yorker

Briefly Noted

Article excerpt

Briefly Noted

Ants Among Elephants, by Sujatha Gidla (Farrar, Straus & Giroux). "Your life is your caste, your caste is your life," Gidla writes, in this memoir of her family's existence as untouchables in India. Her narrative centers on her uncle Satyam, a poet and a Maoist revolutionary, who leads a life of unwavering resistance, acting in political theatre productions, facilitating intercaste marriages, and organizing armed insurrections. Despite being elderly when Gidla tries to record his stories, Satyam often vanishes to join guerrilla fighters. His feats of activism and sacrifice run parallel to blind selfishness: he has always depended on others, particularly women, to do everything for him, even clipping his nails. Gidla examines how oppression drives the oppressed to exploit those who are even more vulnerable.

Oriana Fallaci, by Cristina De Stefano, translated from the Italian by Marina Harss (Other Press). Fallaci, one of Italy's most famous and feared journalists, died in 2006, leaving an adventurous body of work. This engrossing biography portrays a writer who, in her hunger for action and in her autobiographical style of reportage, always thrust herself into a story. Fallaci lived many lives: an adolescent anti-Fascist partisan; an intrepid correspondent, who was gravely injured during Mexico's Dirty War; and, late in life, a vehement Islamophobic and anti-immigrant voice. She drew on inexhaustible reserves of boldness and intensity to establish herself in the boys' club of international journalism. "Subservience is a mortal sin," she once said. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.