Magazine article Variety

Art Mirrors Life in Diy 'Csi' Drama

Magazine article Variety

Art Mirrors Life in Diy 'Csi' Drama

Article excerpt

While I was working on "Dexter," my step-brother was shot and killed. It was headand heart-spinning to suddenly be plunged into a police investigation after having written them for years. The beats were the same - the notification, the autopsy, the funeral - but nothing felt familiar.

The investigation stalled and my family and I became amateur detectives, determined to solve his case. I am hopeful that we will someday have closure, but no matter what the outcome of that case, I will never stop yearning for justice.

This was the inspiration behind "Ultraviolet," a 10-episode crime drama that has taken Poland by storm.

I created a character very much like myself - an amateur sleuth, a little loud and a little messy, who, while on a search for justice reaches out to other ordinary folk to solve crimes that the police either can't or won't. Then I met with Barry Josephson, who had optioned Deborah Halber's nonfiction book, "The Skeleton Crew," which follows amateur detectives on their quests to solve cold cases. Barry and I saw a way to tell the story as a kind of DIY "CSI" where ordinary people are transformed into powerful voices for the dead.

It sold quickly to Fox, but then the regime changed and it fell into turnaround. Sony, ever the advocate for the greatest storytelling, passed the script onto its television networks group, which focuses on creating originals for global audiences. Suddenly the show was getting made - but in Poland, in Polish. …

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