Magazine article Parenting for High Potential

Q & A

Magazine article Parenting for High Potential

Q & A

Article excerpt

Q. My 4th grader was identified and participated in a gifted and talented program in Texas, but we recently moved to Michigan. I am told he doesn't qualify for the gifted program. What can we do?

This situation is more common than you might think. The United States does not have a federal mandate for gifted education. Identification and programming are determined by individual states or, even in some cases, school districts. Here are some things you can do to advocate for your child.

First, organize all pertinent records from your child's former school, plus any correspondence from his or her current school regarding eligibility for the gifted program. Learn all you can about the appeal process and applicable deadlines. Familiarize yourself with appropriate educational lingo to use when talking to teachers and administrators. Knowledge is power. If you don't understand any part of the process, seek an explanation.

A good source of specific information for your area is your state gifted organization or the state's department of education website. NAGC's website can also provide more general resources. Most states require school districts to have a comprehensive written education plan that must be available to the public. Contact the superintendent's office to get a copy and specifically ask where the information on gifted programs can be found in the document. You may also review the school's mission statement on their website.

Request a meeting with school personnel in writing and respond in writing (usually 30 days) to accept an appointment. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.