Magazine article Variety

Unique Objects Populate 'Blade Runner 2049'

Magazine article Variety

Unique Objects Populate 'Blade Runner 2049'

Article excerpt

Italian set decorator Alessandra Querzola, who is Oscar-nominated for her work on "Blade Runner 2049" in tandem with production designer Dennis Gassner, is adamant about pointing out that the retro sci-fi universe they created was a group effort.

Still, there are details of the dystopian Los Angeles and Las Vegas created on soundstages in Budapest's Origo film studios that she feels particularly proud of.

As set decorator, she handled the technology aspect of the film's appearance, "right from the bone scanner that you see at the start," says Querzola. She was also responsible for "all the video monitors, all the [futuristic] devices" - though of course there were art directors behind the designs.

The look of these devices was arrived at after poring through visuals and having discussions with director Denis Villeneuve. "He always has a clear idea of what he wants," she notes. Still, some aspects took as long as two months to make. "Denis gave us some initial indications, then Dennis as production designer established the language, the vision [of the film], also in accordance with [cinematographer] Roger Deakins, who has been fantastic to work with."

Querzola had collaborated with Gassner (an Oscar winner in 1992 with set decorator Nancy Haigh for "Bugsy") on Bond pics "Quantum of Solace" and "Skyfall." On the "Blade Runner" sequel, the two would look at her constantly updated mood boards. "And then we would remove everything that was superfluous or not pertinent," she says. "[It was] a full immersion." Another part of the prep work was checking online to make sure what she was suggesting was something she could indeed provide. …

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