Magazine article Policy & Practice

On Patrol: The Need for Better Collaboration between Front- Line Police Officers and Child Protection Workers

Magazine article Policy & Practice

On Patrol: The Need for Better Collaboration between Front- Line Police Officers and Child Protection Workers

Article excerpt

911 Operator: Sector David, are you available to handle an aided case in your sector?

Sector David: Sector David, on the air. Go Central.

911 Operator: Sector David, I'm showing a 10-54 (ambulance case) in your sector. Mother states that her four-year-old son fell and feels dizzy. Mother states her son does not look well. Do you copy Sector David?

Sector David: 10-4 Central (acknowledge transmission). Show us responding.

The New York Police Department (NYPD) has a radio code1 for child abuse cases (10-35), but this radio transmission is rarely used by Central because no parent ever calls a 911 operator to say that they have committed a crime against their own child. Evasively, they typically say the child is sick. Not until patrol officers respond to the scene and make an initial assessment will they determine that, in fact, this is really a code 10-35. The NYPD Patrol Guide General Aided Cases, Procedure 216-01, offers guidelines to assist police officers in defining aided cases:

"Any occurrence coming to the attention of a uniformed member of the service which requires that a person, other than a prisoner, receive medical aid or assistance because such person is:

a. Sick or injured (except vehicle or bicycle collision).

b. Dead (except vehicle or bicycle collision).

c. Lost person.

d. Mentally ill.

e. An abandoned, destitute, abused or neglected child.

f. Runaway child.

g. Adult requiring care due to arrest, hospitalization, death of parent/ guardian/person responsible for care."2

Sometimes police officers can quickly determine if a child was physically abused; often they cannot. The initial contact will be with the person who called 911. The information taken for the complaint report will be given to the officers by that person-possibly the offender. If the officers suspect child abuse, unless there are visible injuries or serious physical injuries, the officers cannot ask the child if their parent hurt them. All questions are directed to the adult. Only if injuries are apparent and probable cause exists, can an arrest can be made.

There are instances when police officers, as mandated reporters, call the Statewide Central Registry to report suspected child abuse. In this case, a call must be made. This will be the first time that police officers collaborate with the Administration for Children's Services/Child Protective Services (ACS/CPS) while on patrol. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.