Magazine article Variety

Legacy Rights Make Business Might

Magazine article Variety

Legacy Rights Make Business Might

Article excerpt

Two of the biggest films of the fall season - "A Star Is Born" and "Bohemian Rhapsody" - are centered around music. "Straight Outta Compton" introduced N.W.A.'s music and story to a whole new generation. Netflix and Hulu and Showtime are filled with music documentaries and biopics, many about figures who are hardly household names (millions know Bert Berns' songs, but how many know who he is?). There's little question that we're in an unprecedented time for music and screens.

As during any boom time, players are casting a careful eye on what they own, what they want, and how much they can charge or pay for it - not to mention whether a project is consistent with their artist's business and (sorry, we've gotta use this word sooner or later) brand.

These topics and more will be explored and unpacked at the In the Zeitgeist - Music Documentaries and Biopics panel at Variety's Music for Films summit. What is attractive to an estate or rights-holder and makes them want to become involved in a film or TV project? Conversely, how can rightsholders present an artist or catalog in a way that makes it seem ripe for such a project? Lending their expertise will be manager Deborah Mannis-Gardner, owner/president of DMG Clearances and music supervisor of "The Defiant Ones"; estate manager Jeff Jampol; music supervisor Jonathan McHugh; John Ottman, editor, "Bohemian Rhapsody"; and Heather Parry, president of production, film and television at Live Nation Prods.

Key to any successful project is a level of authenticity that still manages to deliver a strong story. …

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