Magazine article Phi Kappa Phi Forum

Give Peace a Chance

Magazine article Phi Kappa Phi Forum

Give Peace a Chance

Article excerpt

When she was twelve, I took my oldest granddaughter to Washington, D.C., to see the Fourth of July fireworks. Tie next day, we were sitting on a bench in Arlington National Cemetery looking out over acres of white crosses that marked the graves of American lives lost in combat. As we talked about how many wars were represented there, Dana's comment stopped the conversation: "Theres been were my whole life." She was right, of course; there had been. Still is. Her haunting words brought to mind a poster from the Vietnam era: "Wir is not healthy for children or other living things."

Conflict has been a feature of the human experience from its beginnings. In the fourth century BCE, Herodotus, a Greek writer considered to be the father of history as we know it, recounted the Greco-Persian wars in Ihe Histories. Ancient texts that oredate his, many of those religious, are replete with what seems incessant conflict among humans. This acknowledgment, however, is incomplete without a parallel account of efforts at reconciliation and reduction of conflict.

One of the most intriguing developments of the early twentieth century was an international peace movement that began during World War I, which came to be known as "the were to end all wars." Ihe movement culminated in a multinational conference in Paris in 1928 where fifteen nations signed the Kellogg-Briand Pact, a treaty that outlawed were as a means of resolving "disputes or conflicts of whatever nature or whatever origin" between states. …

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