Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Now, It's Dylan the Actor; First It Was the Perrier, Then the Bafta-Winning Black Books. Now, with a Lead Role Alongside Michael Caine in the Actors, Dylan Moran Is about to Taste Full-Blown fame.But, He Tells Rupert Mellor, He Won't Be Courting It

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Now, It's Dylan the Actor; First It Was the Perrier, Then the Bafta-Winning Black Books. Now, with a Lead Role Alongside Michael Caine in the Actors, Dylan Moran Is about to Taste Full-Blown fame.But, He Tells Rupert Mellor, He Won't Be Courting It

Article excerpt

Byline: RUPERT MELLOR

Ever since the Irish stand-up comedian Dylan Moran appeared in the 1999 TV series How Do You Want Me?, he has had to reconcile himself to a certain degree of fame. 'What started to happen was that people thought they recognised me from the office or something, that my name was Steve and I worked by the photocopier,' he says. 'If it stays at that level, I'll be very happy.' Given his latest career move, that looks unlikely. Having consolidated his small-screen status co-writing and starring in two series of the Bafta award-winning Black Books in 2000 and 2001, 31-year-old Moran this Friday turns movie star. With no more film experience than a cameo in 1999's Notting Hill as Rufus the burglar, Moran beat hundreds of other hopefuls to the lead role in The Actors, in the process walking into some very elevated company.

A knockabout farce throwing two nowherebound theatre actors into a vicious underworld feud, The Actors boasts a dazzling supporting cast that includes Michael Gambon, Miranda Richardson and, as Moran's sleazy mentor, Sir Michael Caine. Although characteristically quiet on the subject, Moran will admit to having been a little starstruck. 'Michael's really in the pantheon, he's one of the movie faces that everybody carries in their head. He's done films that I've loved from when I

was young - Get Carter, Sleuth, The Man Who Would Be King. So yeah, I was pretty pleased.' Romping through an explosion of costumes, prosthetics and accents, Moran and Caine portray characters ranging from Shakespearean hams to a Scottish hitman and lady gangster, and they proved an incendiary team on set, both contributing ad libs to the film's final cut. 'Michael's a natural,' says Moran. 'And it was a great craic to have that much rope extended to you, you know?' Despite the massive boost The Actors will give his professional profile, Moran, who left London for Edinburgh four years ago and lives there with a wife and daughter about whom he has never spoken publicly, is adamant that he can avoid the trashier trappings of fame if he wants to. And he wants to. 'Celebrity culture now seems to be running at some insane pitch. It's like, "OK, who want's to be next?" Someone runs in, boob job jiggling, going "Me-Me-Me-Me-Me-Me!" "OK, what's your name darling? Samantha? OK Samantha, stand over there and do your thing, yeah!"

Next thing it's "F*** off, Samantha. Next!" It seems these people are chosen for their willingness to be disposed of.' Moran's career was built on rather more than implants and enthusiasm. At the age of 20 and with no more focused a career plan than 'I wanted to see if I could make a living just making shit up,' he was galvanised by a standup set from Ardal O'Hanlon at Dublin's Cavern club, and debuted on the same stage a week later. …

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