Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Any Other Business

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Any Other Business

Article excerpt

Byline: By Peter Young

Some observers reckon it's been a waste of time and money and an example of politicians acting like big kids. But a squabble over Newcastle city councillors using their council e-mail addresses for political purposes refuses to go away. It started when Labour lodged a complaint against Liberal Democrat, Greg Stone, claiming he had breached the councillors' code of conduct by using his council e-mail address on a political website. This was upheld by the Civic Centre. Coun Stone hit back by lodging a counter complaint to the Standards Board for England claiming three Labour councillors had done the same. The board has now ruled that while an e-mail address is technically a council resource, using it on a political website does not necessarily breach the code. The address is a point of contact for councillors and costs the council nothing, says the board. Coun Stone said: 'I'm pleased the Standards Board has seen fit to use common sense. I feel vindicated. 'The board's comments support the view that wide availability of council e-mail addresses is a good thing. I will be calling on the council to review its code of conduct provisions relating to use of e-mail addresses which will hopefully prevent any repeat of this ludicrous situation.'' A council spokesman said: 'If Coun Stone wishes to call for a review of the council's code of conduct then he is entitled to do so.''

PASSENGERS were alarmed when a Metro train travelling into Newcastle came to a shuddering halt near Jesmond station. The driver apologised for braking so sharply then explained that he'd stopped to let a family of ducks cross the line. The identity of the Metro's own St Francis of Assisi remains a mystery. Officials at Nexus which runs the Metro say the incident was not recorded in the railway's log.

NORTH East European Parliament hopeful Fiona Hall reckons shoppers may be unwittingly encouraging a cruel trade in cat and dog skins when they purchase fur trimmed gloves or cuddly toys, More than two million cats and dogs are killed in the Far East each year and thousands end up as hats, coats and even children's toys in European shops. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.