Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Schools Fail New Federal Standards; Few Meet Targets of No Child Left Behind

Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Schools Fail New Federal Standards; Few Meet Targets of No Child Left Behind

Article excerpt

Nearly 90 percent of Florida's public schools failed to meet reading and math standards this year under the new federal No Child Left Behind Law.

The Miami Herald reported yesterday morning that the data found only 13 percent of the state's schools demonstrated "adequately yearly progress" to meet No Child Left Behind standards. State education officials were scheduled to release the results later in Tallahassee.

No Child Left Behind looks at minority, disabled or impoverished students. But some education officials said the numbers might counter arguments that Gov. Jeb Bush's A+ Plan for Education has created steady improvement by schools.

"What purpose does it serve to call a school an 'A' if it's not making adequate progress?" asked Sam Yarger, dean of the University of Miami School of Education.

Bush has touted continuing improvement in the state's school grades. This year, there were six times as many A schools than when grading began in 1999, and fewer than half as many F schools.

But the poor showing under No Child Left Behind -- a key component of President Bush's 2000 campaign -- carried into those A schools: Of 1,229 statewide, only 22 percent made adequate yearly progress.

Six percent of the state's B schools succeeded, followed by 2 percent of C schools. No D or F schools qualified.

In Duval County, even some high-performing schools such as Paxon School for Advanced Studies did not meet the federal standard.

Duval County school Superintendent John Fryer said schools that did not meet the federal standards should not be discouraged.

"Keep focusing on the criteria from the state," Fryer said. "That's tough enough."

Students at those schools are eligible to transfer to a better performing public school. In Duval County, 550 students from eight elementary and middle schools that did not meet the federal standard opted to transfer to another public school this year. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.