Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Boy, 15, Knifed as He Hands Mobile Phone to Mugger; 'IT WAS CALLOUS, IT WAS COLD BECAUSE HE DIDN'T ARGUE, HE DIDN'T FIGHT BACK'

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Boy, 15, Knifed as He Hands Mobile Phone to Mugger; 'IT WAS CALLOUS, IT WAS COLD BECAUSE HE DIDN'T ARGUE, HE DIDN'T FIGHT BACK'

Article excerpt

Byline: JAMES FRASER-ANDREWS

A SCHOOLBOY was stabbed in the stomach and arm as he tried to hand over his mobile phone to a mugger, it was revealed today.

Brendan Headd, 15, who is critically ill but stable in hospital, was left bleeding on the pavement in Walthamstow Market as his teenage attacker fled empty-handed.

Detectives said the stabbing was an "unprovoked, totally unnecessary violent use of force" because Brendan was reaching for his phone after being threatened.

His parents today told how a passer-by probably saved their son's life by stopping to help as he lay on the ground.

The anonymous man called his mother Patricia to tell her Brendan had been stabbed.

Mrs Headd said: "I can't thank that gentleman enough. One of the first things Brendan asked when he came round was to see if we had called him.

"It's scary to think we came so close to losing such a dear little lad. It doesn't bear thinking about that we could be burying him for a cheap phone.

"We've always said it doesn't matter about the phone if he was in a situation like this. But he said 'Mum, I tried to give it to him'.

"But that didn't matter to whoever did this. It was callous, it was cold because he didn't argue, he didn't fight back. We've brought him up better than that."

Brendan was attacked yesterday morning as he walked to his school, which was only five minutes away. He was dragged to one side by the mugger. Mrs Headd, a manager at a butcher's shop in Highbury, continued: " Brendan's not a streetwise kid. He's a very innocent 15-year-old who is always the first to do something to help somebody. He is totally inoffensive and very caring."

She said her son had overcome childhood learning difficulties caused by an early bout of measles.

He had chosen to attend a specialist school 40 minutes away from his home because of fears of bullying at nearby secondary schools.

Mrs Headd said: "He had measles when he was a baby which affected the growth of the brain and he had problems remembering things at primary school. …

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