Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Learning to Love a 'Monster'; Hate Those Huge People Carriers Which Clog City Streets? the New Citroen C8 Could Help to Change Your Viewpoint

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Learning to Love a 'Monster'; Hate Those Huge People Carriers Which Clog City Streets? the New Citroen C8 Could Help to Change Your Viewpoint

Article excerpt

Byline: DAVID WILLIAMS

LASHING out at people carriers has become a neurosis with some Londoners. They attack their size, shape, height and moan that they block roads outside schools.

The last is probably true and is testament to the fact that you can't get a better family vehicle. And, while they look big, many are no longer than a traditional estate.

Their shape? Well, it's an acquired taste. I'm utterly convinced by the benefits of the MPV; once you've enjoyed the feeling of space and the high-up driving position it is hard to go back to a car for day-today convenience or long tours.

Earlier this year we subjected Ford's Galaxy to a few thousand miles on holiday and workaday assignments;, now we are seeing how one of the latest batch of challengers, the handsome new Citroen C8, built on the same production line as the Fiat Ulysse and Peugeot 807, has moved the game forward.

The C8 costs from [pounds sterling]18,300 for the twolitre petrol LX to [pounds sterling]26,200 for the 2.2 HDI diesel. We're driving the model we believe most Londoners in the market for this vehicle would choose - the two-litre auto diesel, costing [pounds sterling]24,700.

Citroen says it can achieve around 39mpg, which, with an 80-litre fuel tank, means a range of around 600 miles is possible.

It is not just good mpg, representing a potential financial saving, it also means fewer journeys interrupted while you queue at the garage.

This vehicle has family motoring down to a fine art.

Key features of this particular C8 - the Exclusive seven-seater - are three rows of seating with three separate seats across the centre and two at the rear, a flip-down DVD screen in the roof and passenger doors that slide open and shut at the press of a button; great for confined multi-storey or supermarket car parks.

The Exclusive trim adds around [pounds sterling]2,400 to the price compared with the next model down, but you do get a long list of extra equipment.

"Toys" include electrically adjustable and heated front seat with memory positions, electric middle and front windows, a clever built-in "child surveillance" mirror, cruise control, and - for drinks cans or chocolate in hot weather - an airconditioned locker in front. …

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