Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

The Boy Who Went to the Dentist for a Few Routine Fillings and Ended Up with Brain Damage; FIRST INTERVIEW WITH MOTHER OF 12-YEAR-OLD LEFT CLINICALLY DEAD AFTER TREATMENT

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

The Boy Who Went to the Dentist for a Few Routine Fillings and Ended Up with Brain Damage; FIRST INTERVIEW WITH MOTHER OF 12-YEAR-OLD LEFT CLINICALLY DEAD AFTER TREATMENT

Article excerpt

Byline: ALEXA BARACAIA

WHEN three-year-old Jay Ali went to the dentist, his parents believed it would just be a routine visit for a couple of fillings.

The boy sat on his father's lap to be given a general anaesthetic - common practice for children of his age at the time - and drifted off to sleep.

But after the treatment, Jay failed to come round. Only then was it realised he had stopped breathing.

In fact, the toddler had been clinically dead for seven minutes and, although he was eventually revived, he had suffered permanent brain damage.

The case, and others like it, led to a ban on general anaesthetics in dentists' surgeries.

Now, nine years later, the High Court has awarded Jay and his family [pounds sterling]1.5 million for the damage he suffered.

Jay's mother Tracey Lee told the Standard today: " I'm delighted. All I wanted was a public apology and for it never to happen again.

"The money came as a surprise but a welcome one. One of my biggest worries has been what will happen to Jay if I'm not around? He won't ever be able to work or live alone. Now I know there are funds being held to pay for his long-term care and that's a huge weight off my mind."

Ms Lee, 31, whose nine-year relationship with Jay's father, Leon, was ripped apart by the tragedy, said her son was changed beyond recognition.

"He was so independent and bright," she says. "He could kick a ball with such force his dad would have to duck. He was talking, knew his colours and could count to 10 by 18 months. You couldn't shut him up."

Now, he is barely able to walk to the local playing fields unaccompanied.

"His logic is affected - if there's an obstacle in front of him he can't work out what to do to get past it. It used to make him cry because he was so confused," she said. …

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