Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Myths

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Myths

Article excerpt

Myths about speed cameras are commonplace ( and often quite imaginative.

Here, The Journal dispels a few of the more common ones.

Myth. Signs denoting a change in the speed limit are not legal if they are of `repeater' size.

Fact. The RAC Foundation recently alleged that the former small (450mm in diameter) 30mph sign at the Cradlewell Tunnel in Jesmond, Newcastle was illegal and therefore drivers fined for exceeding the limit should be refunded.

However the Northumbria Safety Camera Partnership set the record straight explaining that the smaller sign had not broken any laws.

A Partnership spokesman said: "Very small repeater signs are used to remind about the current limit rather than tell a driver of a change.

"However, as long as a sign is between 300mm and 1,500mm it is legal.

"The sign that was the cause of controversy was 450mm, which was fine.

"It was replaced with a huge 900mm sign and that is probably what wrongly made people think the previous sign had been too small."

Myth. If you drive at a certain speed then the cameras can't take a photograph.

Fact. It's an urban myth that you can drive too fast to be caught on camera. It is, however, correct to say that over a certain speed the vehicle will not appear in the second photograph, but this simply proves you were driving well over the speed limit. Even if you had driven over the secondary check marks at more than 140mph, your speed will still be registered from the first picture and as you're out of shot, you're obviously over the limit.

Myth. I know where all the cameras are so I won't get caught.

Fact. All fixed camera locations and mobile sites can be found on this Safety Partnership website. Their aim is for everyone to be aware of where cameras are.

Camera enforcement officers visit mobile sites on a rolling basis and additional speed enforcement is also carried out by police officers at other sites of local concern. …

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