Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Fulltime Pay for Part-Time Study; Getting Paid to Gain a Professional Qualification Sounds Too Good to Be True, but It Isn't, as Jacky Hyams Explains Education 2004

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Fulltime Pay for Part-Time Study; Getting Paid to Gain a Professional Qualification Sounds Too Good to Be True, but It Isn't, as Jacky Hyams Explains Education 2004

Article excerpt

Byline: JACKY HYAMS

A UNIVERSITY education is desirable but it doesn't suit everyone.

Given the high debt levels acquired by many graduates, it makes sense to explore viable alternatives, such as study courses, that enable you to gain a professional qualification and earn money at the same time. So, what are the options?

"If it is not a graduate-entry occupation, we probably offer a course," says Chris Humphries, City & Guilds director general. City & Guilds is the leading provider of vocational qualifications in the UK.

With more than 500 different qualifications to choose from, millions of people of all ages have received training in their chosen professions via this route, learning and earning simultaneously.

Indeed, many household names willingly attribute their success - in part - to their City & Guilds qualifications, including TV luminaries such as Jamie Oliver, Gary Rhodes and Alan Titchmarsh.

"The City & Guilds training period varies from three months to four years, depending on the qualification and level you are seeking," says Humphries.

"Level 1 is basic entry training and, at the other end of the scale, a level 4 senior engineering technician or master plumber course runs for four years and gives you a higher qualification than A-levels."

In most City & Guilds programmes, there is a period of learning in a classroom or teaching environment -usually one day a week spent at college or in a company training centre. The rest of the time is spent learning on the job, supervised by a company specialist. "As you go through the course, the supervision reduces," says Humphries. "Your earnings depend entirely on a normal salary for a particular sector. In many cases you will be on a full wage for much of your training period."

For people aged between l6 and 24, a modern apprenticeship can be a positive route into a career.

Launched 10 years ago, this has proved hugely successful: last year 180,000 young people in England took a modern apprenticeship, enabling them to learn, earn and gain a nationally recognised qualification. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.