Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Dennis Hasn't Had Time to Be Sick for 37 Years, ... He's Too Busy Caring for Others; EXTRAORDINARY WORKERS RECOGNISED IN OUR NHS CHAMPIONS AWARDS

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Dennis Hasn't Had Time to Be Sick for 37 Years, ... He's Too Busy Caring for Others; EXTRAORDINARY WORKERS RECOGNISED IN OUR NHS CHAMPIONS AWARDS

Article excerpt

DENNIS RENTON is one NHS worker who doesn't know what it's like to be ill - he hasn't taken a day off sick in 37 years.

He is also a man who knows the value of a comforting word or a joke when patients are feeling vulnerable. As supervisor of a team of porters, Mr Renton brightens up patients' lives by doing his job cheerfully and efficiently, and offering a comforting shoulder when it's needed. Added to that, he has donated 76 units of blood in 34 years, no doubt saving countless lives. Yesterday, he was one of 10 extraordinary health employees, nominated by our readers, to be recognised at the second annual NHS Champions Awards.

The awards were launched by the Evening Standard and are run with the health think-tank the King's Fund and ITV1's London Tonight.

Presenting the prizes, Veronica Wadley, editor of the Evening Standard, praised the dedication of the winners. Each receives [pounds sterling]5,000 - [pounds sterling]2,500 to keep and [pounds sterling]2,500 to spend on something that will benefit their patients. Here, we explain what makes them such Champions ...

.SUPPORT STAFF Winner: Dennis Renton, 62, porter at St Bart's Hospital.

Runner-up: Steve Heather, 47, chief medical technical officer in the Sleep and Ventilation Unit at the Royal Brompton Hospital.

.NURSES Winner: Tammy Lee, 50, community psychiatric nurse at the Larkwood Centre in Walthamstow, part of the North East London Mental Health Trust.

Mrs Lee said: "I see the good, the bad and the ugly, but there is a soft spot in all of us and we need to understand how to unlock that. I find it rewarding when I see patients go away and get on with their lives."

Runner-up: Emma Prescott, a sister at the Thalassaemia Unit at The Whittington Hospital NHS Trust.

She helped to set up the unit at the hospital almost 10 years ago to support the thousands of people who have the inherited blood disorder. …

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