Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Easy Ride for Mr Orange; 'Kilroy Ended Up Looking like a Conceited, Arrogant, Ignorant, Xenophobic Boor When He Should Have Seemed Much, Much Worse'

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Easy Ride for Mr Orange; 'Kilroy Ended Up Looking like a Conceited, Arrogant, Ignorant, Xenophobic Boor When He Should Have Seemed Much, Much Worse'

Article excerpt

Byline: VICTOR LEWIS-SMITH

HALF term is almost upon us, and the tedium of a long-haul flight lies in store for many. So to prevent the onset of ennui as you and your family travel to your holiday destination, why not discreetly slip a gun-shaped piece of Bacofoil or a small bag of talcum powder into your kids' luggage, and place bets with your partner as to what the authorities at Singapore airport will do with them on arrival.

Alternatively, you could take a couple of sachets of tomato ketchup on board, empty them over your ear lobe while the stewardess is giving the safety lecture, then call her over and ask innocently, "Is this supposed to happen?" Or why not ask to speak to the captain during the flight, then tell him that you've already seen the in-flight film, so could he fly low over a drive-in movie instead?

No matter how boring the in-flight entertainment gets, it's seldom advisable to walk out in mid-performance, but had Kilroy: Behind the Tan been showing on the 747's screens, there would have been several good reasons to do so. Bad enough was the revolting sight of Robert Kilroy-Silk himself, a Thunderbirds puppet turned politician whose Bikini Atoll skin colouring is surely a pigment of the imagination (scoring a whacking 11.5 on the Judith Chalmers scale), and whose vainglorious attempts to become a latter-day Pierre Poujade are achieving what had previously seemed impossible: making even David Icke look statesmanlike in comparison.

More terrible still were his ghastly wife Jan, sporting a turtle neck (skin, not sweater), breasts worn fashionably around the navel, Esther Rantzen teeth and a personality to match, and the assorted MEPs of UKIP, a bunch so unremittingly bigoted that even Alessandro Mussolini denounced them as unacceptably right wing.

But most sickening of all was the feeble direction and interviewing of Emeka Onono, a limp Julian Clary soundalike and former Kilroy employee who always took no for an answer, allowed every door to be shut in his face (even BBC ones), and generally gave his ex-boss such an easy time that Kilroy ended up looking like a conceited, arrogant, ignorant, xenophobic boor, when he should have seemed much, much worse.

Given that the press has been exhaustively chronicling the former daytime TV presenter's disastrous foray into politics for some time, the only justification for this documentary would have been if it had shown us something we didn't already know.

But instead, it spent much of its time

simply rehashing the relevant news stories of the past year, from the "Arabs are limb amputators" newspaper column that precipitated his departure from the BBC (in Kilroy's fevered mind, incidentally, Iranians and Afghans are "Arabs"), to his failed leadership coup at UKIP and subsequent resignation. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.