Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Bennett Elementary Becomes Water World; District's Program Teaches Kids to Protect and Conserve the Resource

Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Bennett Elementary Becomes Water World; District's Program Teaches Kids to Protect and Conserve the Resource

Article excerpt

Byline: PATTI LEVINE-BROWN, Clay County Line correspondent

A big smile came across Julia Meadows' face as she ran her small fingers through the green and pink fluorescent paints and then carefully applied the colors to the paper in front of her. After a few moments, the 7-year-old paused, picked up the paper, examined it closely and decided the stenciled drawing of the fish she had just colored needed a bit more pink.

Once she was satisfied with her creation, she handed it over to be taped on the wall. As the youngster stood and gazed at her painting amid numerous other brightly colored aquatic creatures she said, "My fish lives in clean water, and he is happy about that."

Finger painting was just one of several hands-on activities Julia and hundreds of other children chose to participate in as part of a family activity Thursday at Charles E. Bennett Elementary School in Green Cove Springs. The program, titled "Splash into Science," was sponsored by the St. Johns River Water Management District's Watershed Action Volunteer Program and focused on teaching water conservation and water protection.

"I think the best way to learn is to have fun while you are doing it," said Catlynn Philpot, 13, a student at Wilkinson Junior High School who volunteered to help with the elementary school program. "I think the kids got a lot from these activities. They had fun, and they learned from the experience."

The family event was the grand finale to a series of classroom presentations and teacher in-service programs that began March 8. Bennett was the only school in Clay County invited to participate in this program, which enabled students to learn about such things as groundwater that comes from the Floridan aquifer, the area's primary source of drinking water, and also how to reduce stormwater pollution entering the St. Johns River.

Demonstrations ranged from septic tank experiments to using powered drink mix and cocoa products to explain enviroscape, a type of pollution that is hard to control because you cannot pinpoint its source. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.