Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Clay Looks at Twin Lakes Pit to Start; It Would Be Easiest for New Team, Official Says

Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Clay Looks at Twin Lakes Pit to Start; It Would Be Easiest for New Team, Official Says

Article excerpt

Byline: BETH REESE CRAVEY

Clay County wants its illegal-dumping cleanup effort to begin at the Twin Lakes storage pit near Keystone Heights, said DeWayne Igou, chief of the county Environmental Services Department.

Of the six county borrow pits where illegal dumping occurred, Twin Lakes likely is the "lesser challenge," with the least volume and least-complex handling requirements, Igou said.

So Twin Lakes would be an ideal starting point for Public Works crews newly trained -- but inexperienced -- in environmental waste disposal, he said.

"That would be a good place to roll out the team," he said.

But for now, Igou and his task force of county officials and legal and environmental consultants can do little more than wait for the Florida Department of Environmental Regulation to review their revised Waste Investigation, Excavation and Disposal Plan.

The plan was submitted to the DEP's Jacksonville office July 27. The county submitted its initial plan May 20, but the DEP asked for more information and for the plan to be divided into separate initiatives for each pit.

"The DEP wanted us to provide individualized plans for each location," Igou said. "I didn't feel like that was a problem." Also, the revised plan contains some "minor changes and modifications . . . more detail" requested by the DEP, he said.

"That was a good thing for both of us," Igou said.

DEP spokeswoman Jill Johnson said regulators will review the revised plan over the next few weeks.

"We may need to request more information, or we would move forward," she said.

Igou is keeping his fingers crossed that the DEP will not seek more revisions, but be ready after the latest review to enter into a consent agreement with the county, which would outline what the county is required to do and impose deadlines and potential fines. Then the county can get busy with the actual cleanup.

"We're anxious to get started. We are still in the process of getting our crews together and organized," he said. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.