Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

[Pounds Sterling]5,500 PRICE ON MOTHER'S LIFE; EXCLUSIVE: Family of 7/7 Victim Rejects Government's Payout Offer as 'Insult'

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

[Pounds Sterling]5,500 PRICE ON MOTHER'S LIFE; EXCLUSIVE: Family of 7/7 Victim Rejects Government's Payout Offer as 'Insult'

Article excerpt

Byline: AMAR SINGH

THE husband of a woman killed in the 7/7 bombings has rejected compensation of [pounds sterling]5,500 as an "insult".

Nader Mozzaka, 50, told the Evening Standard that the money would do nothing to make up for what he and his two children, Saba and Saeed, have lost.

Behnaz Mozzaka, 47, a biomedical officer at Great Ormond Street Hospital, died in the blast on the Piccadilly line.

Mr Mozzaka's comments come as many of the victims' families and survivors are trying to get money from the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority (CICA).

The Government has come under pressure to act and Tony Blair intervened to speed up some of the first payments.

But families such as the Mozzakas are still angry at the pay-outs they have been offered.

Mr Mozzaka, from Finchley, who met the Queen during the memorial service at St Paul's Cathedral, said: "I am not accepting the [pounds sterling]5,500 they have offered.

This is an insult to me and my family. They must look to pay the families an appropriate

amount for what we have lost. The Queen was very polite when we met her and asked us who it was that we lost, and the Prime Minister also expressed his sympathies, but what can they say?

"We have lost our life, the centre of our world, and no words can change this."

Mr Mozzaka, head of software development at the Health Protection Agency, was offered the [pounds sterling]5,500 as the basic payment for bereaved relatives.

The couple's two children, 24-year-old Saba and Saeed, 22, are entitled to the same amount, bringing the total interim payout to [pounds sterling]16,500.

The Mozzakas will be offered loss-of-earnings compensation which could reach six figures. The scale of CICA payouts is fixed in law and each claim is checked rigorously by officials.

The CICA has been criticised for the amount of time it has taken to offer even interim payments to the victims with the first batch of money sent out at the end of September. The authority blamed delays on receiving police reports but survivors complained they had not been left with enough money on which to survive.

Many have received the interim payments, including bereaved relatives and the seriously injured such as amputees. …

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