Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Come Fly with Me in a Marcos

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Come Fly with Me in a Marcos

Article excerpt

Byline: By Ian Johnson

In world War Two British genius produced a true winner of an aircraft. It was called the de Havilland Mosquito and was a multi-role, cutting-edge technology warplane. It was so good because its construction was mainly plywood, which made it extremely fast and nimble.

So good were the construction techniques used for the Mossie that they were continued in the first de Havilland jet fighter, the Vampire, at the end of the war.

As with a lot of things aeronautical, ply construction filtered down into the car world and was utilised to produce a 1960s sports car that was so beautiful it looked as if it was flying even when it was standing still.

The Marcos 1800 of the mid-1960s looked like a slimmed down Jaguar E-Type. It had a subtlety of line that few makers have recaptured since.

As one fan said: "The only way to make a Lotus Elan Plus 2S look flabby is to park a Marcos next to it." Marcos pulled up short of using stressed ply for the body panels, but the frame and chassis employed the techniques perfected by the aircraft industry. …

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