Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Maritime Industry Pioneer Was 100; He Had Worked as a Ship's Master, Coast Guard Inspector and Bar Pilot

Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Maritime Industry Pioneer Was 100; He Had Worked as a Ship's Master, Coast Guard Inspector and Bar Pilot

Article excerpt

Byline: JESSIE-LYNNE KERR

The man who was Jacksonville's oldest veteran, Jeff Carey, died Tuesday at Community Hospice of Northeast Florida of heart failure. He celebrated his 100th birthday New Year's Eve.

Mr. Carey also figured in Jacksonville's maritime history as a ship's master, Coast Guard inspector, bar pilot association manager and a founding member of the Jacksonville Maritime Museum Society.

A memorial service will be at 11:30 a.m. Friday at First United Methodist Church, 225 E. Duval St., followed by a reception in the church's Fellowship Hall.

A native of Northumberland County, Va., Mr. Carey completed his education at the College of William and Mary in 1928. He went to work for a shipping line, the Merchants and Miners Transportation Co. of Baltimore, eventually earning his unlimited master's license. He served 13 years in the Merchant Marine, first going to sea and then with its Inspection Agency, which inspected the hulls of Liberty ships built in Jacksonville. When that agency was taken over by the Coast Guard in 1942, he was commissioned a lieutenant commander.

After the war, Mr. Carey became a bar pilot directing large ships from the Atlantic up the St. Johns River and into the Port of Jacksonville. He retired as manager of the St. Johns Bar Pilot Association in 1968.

Fred Sandberg, 87, retired president of Gulf Atlantic Transport Co., calls himself Mr. Carey's oldest friend. They met when Sandberg was 12 and sold the Jacksonville Journal along Bay Street after school each day where the ships Mr. Carey sailed would dock.

"Captain Carey let me go onto the dock and sell my papers to the passengers as they came down the gangway," Sandberg said.

In those days, the ships carried both passengers and freight and by the time they docked in Jacksonville, the passengers had been at sea for at least four days, meaning four days without any news. …

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