Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

CAPTURING MOMENTS; Upcoming Exhibit at the Cummer Explores Relationship between Renowned Scenic Photographer Ansel Adams and the Founder of the Polaroid Corp

Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

CAPTURING MOMENTS; Upcoming Exhibit at the Cummer Explores Relationship between Renowned Scenic Photographer Ansel Adams and the Founder of the Polaroid Corp

Article excerpt

Byline: LILLA ROSS

The names of Ansel Adams and Polaroid are two of the best known in American photography. But the casual fan of Adams' landscapes and Polaroid's instant magic probably wouldn't put the two together.

In fact, they were intertwined. And their collaboration will be showcased starting next week at the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens in an exhibit "Ansel Adams & Edwin Land: Art, Science and Invention - Photographs from the Polaroid Collection."

The exhibit, which will be up from Tuesday to Sunday, June 4, will feature more than 80 prints by Adams, including Moonrise, Hernandez, New Mexico, and Moon and Half Dome. In addition, the exhibit includes Polaroid black-and-white prints, four wall-size photomurals, correspondence and postcards. A variety of events, including a juried photography show and a river tour, are planned in conjunction with the exhibit.

Much of Adams' work is instantly recognizable, but Land is not as well known. He is the "Land" of the Polaroid Land Camera, which was all the rage in the '50s because the photo developed within minutes.

Even in the digital age,

Polaroid still sells instant cameras and film based on the technology he developed.

Adams was a bit of a geek. He loved the science of photography as much as the art, said Maarten van de Guchte, director of the Cummer.

"Ansel Adams was interested in how to control the process," van de Guchte said. "How to control light, exposure, depth. He developed a whole scale of tonal qualities from black at one end of the spectrum to white on the other."

Gainesville photographer Jerry Uelsmann met Adams in the late '60s when he was asked to teach at one of Adams' workshops in Carmel, Calif. They saw each other a couple of times a year until Adams' death in 1984.

"Adams liked the Polaroids for teaching because you could have instant feedback," Uelsmann said. …

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