Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Advertisement Feature - Competition Hots Up as North East Finalists Compete in the National Lottery Awards 2006

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Advertisement Feature - Competition Hots Up as North East Finalists Compete in the National Lottery Awards 2006

Article excerpt

Four inspiring lottery-funded projects have been selected from hundreds of others to reach the North East final of The National Lottery Awards 2006.

The Awards highlight the breadth and scale of National Lottery funding across the UK and demonstrate the amazing things people are achieving, often with small amounts of money.

The four shortlisted projects in the North East are Saltwell Park, a green oasis in Gateshead; Segedunum Roman Fort Baths and Museum, which has preserved a significant World Heritage Site; the Newcastle Bulls Wheelchair Rugby Club, a sporting outlet for people in wheelchairs; and the Sunderland-based Pallion Action Group, which works with disadvantaged young people.

They were chosen by a panel of high-profile judges ( including the athlete, Jonathan Edwards, Sir Terence Conran, and journalist, Polly Toynbee ( to go head to head in a public vote to claim the title of the North East's National Lottery Project of the Year. The winner will earn a place in the UK final, set to be broadcast on national television later in the year.

Saltwell Park has undergone a dramatic facelift in one of Gateshead's most deprived areas to become a green oasis and a Victorian design gem. It has been restored to its former glory through lottery funding ( and the love and devotion of local volunteers. It now once again boasts its original outstanding Victorian design in both the park and its historic buildings.

The Fort at Segedunum once guarded the eastern end of Hadrian's Wall, the great northern boundary of the Roman Empire and now one of the most significant surviving UK structures from antiquity. With the help of lottery funding, Segedunum is now the most excavated fort along the Wall, and has an impressive museum to display and interpret the finds. The full ground plan of the fort has been laid out and can be viewed from a purpose-built 35-metre high viewing tower, while reconstructions of a Roman military bath house and a section of Hadrian's Wall further enhance the visitor experience. …

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